3 Facts You Didn't Know About Your Dogs Tongue | PetFirst
Pet Care & Health

3 Facts You Didn’t Know About Your Dogs Tongue

by PetFirst Pet Insurance
2 months ago

Why are we talking about our dog’s tongue right now? It may seem odd but you would be shocked at how much you may not know about your dog’s tongue. There’s always more to learn, and always more for our dogs to teach us.  

As you clearly know, your dog uses her tongue every day to drink water, eat food, and maybe even get into things she isn’t supposed to. Continue reading as we look into 3 facts you might not know about your pup’s tongue.

Fact 1: Tongue for Survival  

As humans, we have sweat glands all over our bodies to help us regulate our body temperature. Guess what? Our dogs don’t have that luxury. Dogs pant following strenuous activity because it’s their way of cooling down. It’s their way of regulating their body temperature.  

There’s science to that ‘pant.’ When she pants, she draws cool air through her mouth and into the upper respiratory lining resulting in the evaporation of moisture (AKA thermoregulation).   

Fact 2: Color Indicates Good or Bad Health  

For the most part, our dog’s tongues are pink. Pink is a normal color. But, there are a few dog breeds who have abnormally colored tongues. The Chow Chow, for example, has a purple tongue or purple-spotted tongue. Don’t panic when you see this, it’s completely normal and can be compared to a birthmark.  

When you should worry is if your dog’s tongue all of a sudden begins to change colors. If your dog has a pale tongue, she may be anemic (blood-related condition) or be malnourished.  

If a dog has a yellow tongue, that’s a sign of liver or gallbladder problems (just like when humans turn yellow – commonly known as jaundice).   

If your dog isn’t one of those ‘colored tongue breeds,’ and her tongue is ranging from red to purple/blue, this may be an indication of cancer, diabetes, ingestion of toxins, or GI issues.  

Fact 3: All About the Love  

Some dogs just want to attack you with their kisses. You walk in the door and they’re sitting right there staring you down ready to show you some love. But, that’s not all your dog’s tongue is used for.  

Although our dogs don’t groom themselves as well as a cat does, their tongue does serve to clean as well. If you watch closely, you may notice your dog cleaning herself (lightly). Please note this does not mean you shouldn’t give her a bath. She still needs her bath because her cleaning job isn’t exactly the best.  

Body Language and Health Coincide 

Canine professionals are always emphasizing the importance of communicating via body language with your dog. Understanding what to watch for health-wise is equally as important. Your dog’s tongue alone can help you determine if your dog needs to see the veterinarian.  

As a general rule; if there is any concern, always talk to your vet.  

Here at PetFirst, we know accidents and illnesses happen to all pets. PetFirst is here for every dog and cat. From common colds to more significant health problems, pet insurance can help cover unexpected vet visits.

Pet insurance provides peace of mind that if your pet gets sick or injured, you don’t have to worry about the financial aspect of his treatment.  You can just focus on your pet’s care.

Already have a PetFist Insurance Policy? If you have any specific questions or concerns and want to start a live video call with a veterinarian to discuss them, simply download the new airVet app. All calls on airVet are already covered as part of PetFirst policies.

Does your pet need coverage? You can get a free quote today and help provide the best life possible for your pet.

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