How Much Exercise Does Your Pet Need? | PetFirst
Pet Care & Health

How Much Exercise Does Your Pet Need?

by PetFirst Pet Insurance
1 month ago

Whether you already own a dog or you’re thinking of becoming a pet parent, considering how much exercise your furry friend will need is always something to be aware of.

Similar to people, the answer varies from dog to dog, with the amount of exercise necessary based on age, health, and breed.

Dogs at any age need regular exercise to grow strong, stay healthy and live long happy lives. Not only will your pup see great benefits from regular exercise, but so will you.

In fact, one study showed people who own dogs exercise 30 minutes more each week than people without dogs. 

If you want to ensure your dog is getting all the exercise he needs, follow the general guidelines below. 

If You Have a Puppy 

If you’ve just adopted a puppy, you’re probably still getting used to all of his new sounds, quirks, and habits. You might even laugh when he catches a case of the zoomies, racing through the house like a mad dog before collapsing on his bed just as quickly as he began.

Puppies are known for having a lot of energy — even more than an adult dog. But one big difference is they wear out more quickly, needing frequent naps throughout the day. Because of this, puppies need several short exercise sessions each day, around five to 10 minutes each. 

Some great high-energy activities you can do with your puppy include: 

·      Walking

·      Jogging 

·      Swimming 

·      Playing Fetch 

·      Agility Training 

If you’re unsure of the right exercise routine, talk to your vet about what is appropriate for your puppy.

Remember, as your puppy grows, you will begin to understand his body language better and know when he’s ready for a nap or play time with a squeaky toy.

If You Have an Adult Dog 

When it comes to a healthy adult dog, the most significant indication of their activity level is breed. 

In general, active breeds need 60 to 90 minutes of exercise each day. This could include high-intensity activities like running, hiking or agility training.

You should look for activities that will stimulate your dog both physically and mentally. Dogs tend to thrive when working hard alongside their pet parent. 

Some of the most active dog breeds include: 

·      Corgis 

·      Dalmatians 

·      Siberian Huskies 

·      Border Collies 

·      Irish Setters 

Adult dogs who are a less active breed only require 30 to 60 minutes of exercise each day. This includes toy breeds like Yorkies and chihuahuas, but also giant breeds like Great Danes and Mastiffs.

A day’s worth of activity could mean a slow walk around the neighborhood or even a light game of fetch in the backyard.

Your dog’s health is important, so be sure to speak to your vet about any questions or concerns you may have. If your dog has a medical condition, such as arthritis or respiratory issues, ask about appropriate exercise activities to keep your dog both comfortable and healthy. 

If You Have a Senior Dog 

No matter the breed, keep in mind that a senior dog may not be able to run or fetch like he once did. You might even have to cut your walk routine down to just a few blocks. But regular exercise is just as important for senior dogs as it is for puppies. 

In general, a senior dog needs 30 to 60 minutes of exercise each day. Since long bouts of activities can be hard, try breaking the exercise down into two or more sessions throughout the day. 

Some low-impact exercises your senior dog will love include: 

·      Walking 

·      Swimming 

·      Scent Training 

·      Hide-and-Seek 

·      Hidden Treat Puzzles 

Remember always to observe your senior dog’s behavior when exercising. As the owner, you know your dog’s body language best and can judge when he’s tired or uncomfortable. 

Start Your Dog Exercise Routine 

No matter your dog’s age, breed or ability, exercise is essential. Without it, dogs can become bored and unhealthy. 

One of the most common issues to arise when dogs aren’t getting enough exercise is destructive behavior, like chewing shoes or going to the bathroom inside.

Inactive dogs are also prone to losing muscle mass and gaining weight. This can lead to further complications like arthritis, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

If you don’t have an exercise routine in place, set one in motion with your furry friend. Start slowly and then work your way up to longer walks around town or a hike through the woods.

Don’t forget that mental stimulation — games and obedience training — is just as important as physical exercise.

Make it a family affair and get everyone involved. Or on the days you don’t have time to give your dog the exercise he needs, hire a local dog sitter to take him for a mid-day walk.

Once you begin implementing daily exercise into you and your pup’s routine, you’ll start to see all the great benefits. 

Keep Your Pet Active and Safe Year-Round

As a pet parent, you can find the best insurance coverage for your furry friend with PetFirst and our various options that can fit your families needs.

Accidents and illnesses happen to all pets – extremely active or not. PetFirst is here for every canine (and cat!), from a small cold to big health problems alike.

Pet insurance provides peace of mind that if your pet gets sick or injured you don’t have to think twice about the financial aspect and you can just focus on your pet’s care.

You can get a quote today by visiting our website or by calling our team at 855-270-7387 (option 1). 

Emily is a pet blogger and the creator of Conservation Folks

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